FIDE World Championship Match 2013: Viswanathan Anand vs Magnus Carlsen

  1. 4 years ago
    Edited 4 years ago by Antediluvian

    Note: Game results are posted below as the game ends, so be aware of spoilers.

    The first game of the FIDE World Championship Match finally kicks off today, on 9 November, from Chennai, India.

    The match will consist of 12 games between defending champion Viswanathan Anand and challenger Magnus Carlsen, who won the Candidates Matches earlier in the year.

    Carlsen, the 22-year-old Norwegian, ranked number 1 in the world, has been a grand master since the age of 13, and stands as the clear favourite for the match. But the 43-year-old Anand has an incredible history and reputation, having won the World Championship five times, and so he cannot be written-off whatsoever. Indeed, it will be a very interesting battle.

    For more info, visit the official site . You can stream the game live from here .

  2. Edited 4 years ago by Antediluvian

    Game 1:

    Game result: 1/2 - 1/2

    Overview of game .

    Analysis by GM Daniel King .

  3. Hmm, it seems I must have broken something by trying to post a javascript link. I can't edit my post to fix it.

  4. Yotta

    Nov 9 Administrator
    Edited 4 years ago by Yotta

    I've updated the forum settings so that you can edit your posts.

    Thanks for the info on the FIDE championship. Looking forward to following it.

  5. Edited 4 years ago by Antediluvian

    Game 2:

    Game result: 1/2 - 1/2

    Overview of game .

    Analysis by GM Daniel King .

    There's a rest-day tomorrow. The next game is Tuesday, 12 November, starting 11:30 (GMT+2).

  6. Yotta

    Nov 10 Administrator

    The results of the first two games certainly is a very interesting start to the championship... and a bit unexpected IMHO.

  7. I think it'll start to get interesting very soon. I expected the first few games to be a bit boring and end in draws, because neither Vishy or Magnus would want to enter risky, unclear positions, but I was very surprised by how quickly the games liquidated into draws. Both games were very unambitious, and essentially drawn after 13 moves.

    It's clear that neither player wants to give their opponent any opportunity whatsoever. Both players are incredibly well-prepared for these games, and they've avoided preparation by playing relatively uncommon and stale openings. So far the battle has only been psychological, and in the games to come we will see some real fireworks when they begin playing "fighting" chess.

  8. Yotta

    Nov 11 Administrator
    Edited 4 years ago by Yotta

    Antediluvian I think it'll start to get interesting very soon. I expected the first few games to be a bit boring and end in draws, because neither Vishy or Magnus would want to enter risky, unclear positions, but I was very surprised by how quickly the games liquidated into draws. Both games were very unambitious, and essentially drawn after 13 moves.

    That is what I found interesting. I don't think I've ever drawn a game until the end-game.

    Antediluvian It's clear that neither player wants to give their opponent any opportunity whatsoever. Both players are incredibly well-prepared for these games, and they've avoided preparation by playing relatively uncommon and stale openings. So far the battle has only been psychological, and in the games to come we will see some real fireworks when they begin playing "fighting" chess.

    Looking forward to the rest of the games. Please keep posting them.

  9. Edited 4 years ago by Antediluvian

    Game 3:

    Game result: 1/2 - 1/2

    Overview of game .

    Analysis by GM Daniel King .

  10. Yotta

    Nov 12 Administrator

    ...and the battle continues with a third draw in a row. Wonder who will get the first win?

  11. Edited 4 years ago by Antediluvian

    Game 4:

    Game result: 1/2 - 1/2

    Today's game was definitely the most interesting so far. A bit disappointing for it to end in a draw, especially with the imbalances that suggested we'd see a decisive result, but it was still very exciting. Carlsen gained a pawn in the middle-game, at the cost of giving Anand excellent piece-placement. If Carlsen could consolidate his position and get his pieces active, then he might have proceeded to win, but if he couldn't get out of the knot then Anand would have swept him off the board. A small advantage seemed to sway from side to side, but neither player could gain any momentum, and eventually the game stabilised to a draw.

    Overview of game .

    Video analysis by GM Daniel King .

  12. tallfred

    Nov 13 Moderator

    Thanks for the news: I appreciate being able to keep up with the match like this.

  13. Edited 4 years ago by Antediluvian

    Game 5:

    Game result: 1-0 for Carlsen
    Match score: Carlsen 3 - Anand 2.

    What a game! A couple of imprecise moves from Anand caused him to lose equality in the endgame, and then the advantage slowly moved in Carlsen's favour with each move. Eventually it became it very clear, and Anand was forced to resign.

    Overview of game .

    Video analysis by GM Daniel King .

  14. Is it just me, or has someone else noticed that GM Anand usually let's his challengers draw the first blood?
    I guess the championship really begins from now...

  15. Edited 4 years ago by Antediluvian

    It definitely puts the pressure on Anand to fight for a win now. He's managed in the past, but this time it's against his strongest opponent yet. So yeah, I'm sure it'll get very interesting now.

  16. Edited 4 years ago by Antediluvian

    Game 6:

    Game result: 0-1 for Carlsen
    Match score: Carlsen 4 - Anand 2.

    Carlsen again manages to squeeze water from a stone. Incredible. Anand just couldn't withstand the pressure.

    Game overview .

    Video analysis by GM Daniel King .

  17. tallfred

    Nov 16 Moderator

    Just when Anand had earned the draw he fought so hard for he let it all slide away... In the post-game interview he sounded beaten. Maybe he can get some new fire during the rest day tomorrow, otherwise the match is over as a contest.

  18. Edited 4 years ago by Antediluvian

    Game 7:

    Game result: 1/2 - 1/2

    Not the most exciting game, definitely to the dismay of Anand.

    Game overview .

    Video analysis by GM Daniel King .

  19. Deleted 4 years ago by Yotta
  20. Has it occurred to anyone that far from a disaster this could be Anand's greatest match record. Let's look at his past performances, courtesy of Amadeus, chessgames.com Viswanathan Anand's Match Record (classical):
    +1 -0 =3 vs. Levitt (London Exhibition Match, 1987?)

    < 1991-92 FIDE Candidates: +5 -3 =6 vs 2685 op.2735 performance >

    +4 -1 =1 vs. Dreev (2625) Madras
    +1 -2 =5 vs. Karpov (2730) - quarterfinal, Brussels

    < Exhibition Match, Linares, 1992: +3 -1 =4 vs 2720 op.2809 performance >

    +3 -1 =4 vs. Ivanchuk (2720)

    < 1992 Tilburg KO: +1 -0 =3 vs 2555 op.2644 performance >

    +1 -0 =1 vs. van Wely (2525)
    +0 -0 =2 +0 -2 =0 vs. Tiviakov (2585)

    < 1994-95 FIDE Candidates: +5 -3 =7 vs 2660 op.2710 performance >

    +3 -1 =3 vs. Yusupov (2625)
    +2 -2 =4 +0 -2 =0 vs Kamsky (2695) - semifinal

    < 1994-95 PCA Cycle: +11 -5 =27 vs 2715 op.2763 performance >

    +3 -0 =4 vs. Romanishin (2590)
    +4 -0 =3 vs. Adams (2640)
    +3 -1 =7 vs. Kamsky (2710)
    +1 -4 =13 vs. Kasparov (2795)

    < Exhibition Match, Leon, 1997: +3 -0 =3 vs 2635 op.2826 performance >

    +3 -0 =3 vs. Illescas-Cordoba (2635)

    < 1997 FIDE KO, Groningen: +6 -0 =8 vs 2665 op.2824 performance >

    +2 -0 =0 vs. Nikolic (2630)
    +0 -0 =2 +1 -0 =3 vs. Khalifman (2655)
    +2 -0 =0 vs. Almasi (2615)
    +1 -0 =1 vs. Shirov (2700)
    +1 -0 =1 vs. Gelfand (2695)
    +0 -0 =4 +1 -0 =4 vs. Adams (2680) - final

    < 1998 FIDE World Championship, Lausanne: +2 -2 =2 vs. 2735 op.2735 performance >

    +2 -2 =2 +0 -2 =0 vs. Karpov (2735)

    < 2000 FIDE World Cup, Shenyang (KOs): +2 -0 =4 vs 2701 op.2821 performance >

    +1 -0 =1 vs. Ivanchuk (2719)
    +0 -0 =2 +1 -0 =3 vs. Gelfand (2681)
    +1 -0 =1 vs. Bareev (2702) - final

    < 2000 FIDE WCh KO, New Delhi: +7 -0 =9 vs 2686 op.2848 performance >

    +1 -0 =1 vs. Bologan (2651)
    +1 -0 =1 vs. Lputian (2610)
    +1 -0 =1 vs. Macieja (2565)
    +0 -0 =2 +1 -0 =3 vs Khalifman (2658)
    +1 -0 =3 vs. Adams (2754)
    +3 -0 =1 vs. Shirov (2746) - final

    < 2001 FIDE WCh KO, Moscow: +4 -2 =8 vs 2638 op.2758 performance >

    +1 -1 =0 +1 -0 =1 vs. Touzane (2368)
    +1 -0 =1 vs. Nielsen (2620)
    +0 -0 =2 +1 -0 =1 vs. Tkachiev (2632)
    +1 -0 =1 vs. Dreev (2676)
    +1 -0 =1 vs. Shirov (2706)
    +0 -1 =3 vs. Ivanchuk (2731) - semifinal

    < 2002 Eurotel Trophy, Prague: +1 -0 =1 vs 2690 op.2883 performance >

    +1 -0 =1 vs. Karpov (2690) - final

    < 2002 World Cup, Hyderabad: +2 -0 =4 vs 2665 op.2883 performance > +1 -0 -1 vs. Malakhov (2670)
    +0 -0 =2 +1 -0 =3 vs Dreev (2673)
    +1 -0 -1 vs. Kasim (2653)

    < 2004 Dortmund Tournament: +0 -0 =4 vs 2756 op.2756 performance >

    +0 -0 =2 +2 -0 =2 vs. Leko (2741) - semifinal
    +0 -0 =2 +1 -0 =1 vs. Kramnik (2770) - final

    < 2008 FIDE World Championship, Bonn: +3 -1 =7 vs 2772 op.2836 performance >

    +3 -1 =7 vs. Kramnik (2772)

    < 2010 FIDE World Championship, Sofia: +3 -2 =7 vs 2805 op.2834 performance >

    +3 -2 =7 vs. Topalov (2805)

    <2012 FIDE World Championship, Moscow
    Gelfand — Anand 6 — 6 Tie-break 1½ — 2½

    <Overall: +56 -19 =100 +9 -4 =20 vs 2700 opposition: 2774 performance 2717 in tiebreakers>

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